Pet Circle – Instagram and Subscriptions

SUMMARY

This episode welcomes back Daniel McGowan and Louise Flynn, Growth Marketing Consultants for Fractal, as they pick apart Pet Circle’s subscription marketing model. The company leverages social media to create social proof to reach their well-defined target audience: people with disposable income, use subscription services and, are time-poor. The brand is focused on making life easy and solving problems and this is evident even with its efficient packaging and logistics.


HIGHLIGHTS

01:56 Pet Circle subscriptions: Convenience with a catch

07:23 Using a data-driven approach to sell a commodity

12:45 Instagram for UGC, social proof, and incentivisation 

22:12 Pet Circle branding with social media and expert packaging


QUOTES

08:27 “They’ve done a couple of things that I think, at a marketing level, are very much about data-driven marketing and personalisation to kind of drive where they’re taking their marketing strategy.”

08:43 “What is something that everyone’s selling and how do you structure your go-to-market and your offering and your pure-play store to achieve the same ends of a viable business with regular custom?”

13:51 “It is low-cost, high-impact social proof, social marketing. It’s pretty simple and, to me, I like it. I think it’s a great strategy and they’re doing a good job.”

15:15 “They’ve got the packaging to go with it and they’re incentivized. So tips and tricks for the kids playing at home, if you want that kind of influencer play, you do need to build the atmosphere to get that great photo.”

26:33 “The subscription-only just reinforces back to the brands they’re carrying that they’re again ensuring that, when someone comes into the Pet Circle sphere of influence, they’re going to stay there no matter if they’re intermittent buyers or whether they just want the problem solved.”

Numa and the Power of Case Studies with Andrew Miller

This episode of Fractal Marketing features Andrew Miller, Startup Marketing Advisor & Coach at AndrewStartups. He discusses Numa, an AI that answers calls for businesses and the strategies they use to pitch to retail SMB’s. Gerard and Andrew take a closer look at their website and the ways Numa creates trust in their ideal customers.

Andrew details the way companies can utilize concepts like loss aversion and split testing to really figure out who they should be marketing to. He also provides actionable tips on outreach to provide real value in their messaging because the desire to help allows businesses to be aggressive in their marketing.


HIGHLIGHTS

01:01 Introduction to Numa: Andrew’s experience

06:35 Capitalizing on loss aversion and utilizing split testing

10:26 Examining Numa’s on-site tools and strategies

20:32 Outreach strategies: How to catching attention with value propositions

25:44 A desire to help enables aggressive marketing


QUOTES

06:22 “Numa’s a hundred bucks a month. It’s an incredible way for any business to get a couple more sales a month guaranteed for just a hundred bucks. It’s an easier pitch than you think now.”

12:55 “The bottom line is, if you’re a bootstrapped company, use every single opportunity to not pay for something.”

17:24 “Social proof is the reason why influencer marketing exists and sometimes beats paid advertising. We are social creatures. Even if it’s fake, we believe it. And we believe it more than if we just saw the company talk about it on their own.”

23:46 “I’m focused on what am I saying, how am I saying it, and is there a lot of value in my message. And if there is, I know it’s going to be received well enough. The same has been true with hundreds of companies I’ve run automated campaigns for.”

28:29 “When you really feel like you’re spending this time and this effort in your life trying to solve this problem, then you can be aggressive in the marketing. You’re always focused on helping this segment.”

25:44 A desire to help enables aggressive marketing


RESOURCES

Numa’s website: https://numa.com

Andrew’s website: https://andrewstartups.com

Andrew’s email: [email protected]

Andrew’s Book https://publishizer.com/0-growth/

25% off my course link and write up for the episode: https://andrewstartups.mykajabi.com/offers/LEyiwCGp?coupon_code=FRACTAL25

Kajabi picking a positioning fight with every B2B SaaS company – Guest Louise Flynn

This episode features Louise Flynn, Founder and Marketing Advisor at Rulu Marketing. She talks about Kajabi, an online business platform that replaces multiple tools and offers a full-stack solution to solopreneurs, and how it positions itself to this very specific target market.

Louise and Gerard discuss their free trial offer and the curious credit card requirement that comes with it. They also break down the company’s acquisition strategies, marketing funnels, as well as their incidental success with the world’s increased reliance on digital communication today.


HIGHLIGHTS

02:51 Kajabi: Offering a full-stack solution

08:06 Leveraging the community of brands that use Kajabi

14:53 Kajabi’s 14-day free trial and credit card requirement

19:45 Discussing acquisition strategies and marketing funnels

33:38 Product marketing successes


QUOTES

07:13 “For some who find the technology a little bit overwhelming, the aspirational brand messaging really brings them forward, brings them through and they begin to see the life with Kajabi in it.”

09:20 “They have a heroes program that they talk about where they’re constantly sending out merch just to reward people for hitting certain revenue targets on the platform. So they’re trying to actively engage the community.”

21:20 “I don’t see a lot of marketing outside of the website and I wonder why that is whether they just were used to being bootstrapped and they haven’t built a big enough acquisition funnel with enough different aspects to it.”

27:09 “If you pick a very specific persona, that promise has to really land. You can’t really build the huge dream. It’s got to be so relevant and they seem to be targeting a persona which is business-driven coaches and consultants.”

34:59 “Instead of trying to kind of be everything to everyone and not being able to secure any of the market, they’ve just decided on the type of person that’s interesting to them.”


RESOURCES

Kajabi demo (credit card required): https://kajabi.com/demo

Kajabi Access for $99: https://kajabi.com/access

Kajabi on Facebook Business: https://www.facebook.com/ads/library/?active_status=all&ad_type=all&country=ALL&view_all_page_id=113897981972497

Fall Guys Marketing Launch Review with Daniel McGowan

In this episode of Fractal Marketing features Daniel McGowan, Co-Founder at Humble Links, discusses the almost overnight rise to fame of Fall Guys: Ultimate Knockout. Today, Daniel introduces what makes the game so unique and its appeal to gamers. He explains the role of their Twitter in growing the brand and how having a gamer manage it had been central in communicating the language of gamers to gamers. Daniel also explores the advantages of indie game developers and how the stage is set for them to achieve massive success moving forward.

RESOURCES
https://twitter.com/fallguysgame
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyADwdiW7rQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXdeNa9d9sg
https://www.linkedin.com/in/daniel-mcgowan/
https://www.hmbl.ink/directory

QUOTES
01:23 “It’s kind of like those original Japanese game shows where they put their contestants through hell, except these ones are like jelly beans with legs.”
04:19 “They just had a really good Twitter account. They really pushed memes everywhere and I think it really captured their audience because their audience, gamers, are just who they are.”
16:13 “Most of the user content has come from people griefing other people. Like there’s a special stage where there’s only one little bridge and people can stand on that bridge and other people try to get on it, they get knocked off.”
21:57 “Any branding, or any marketing for any company, is community. Community with a face. Not so much community but a community with a face. Having someone behind who is driving your community that everybody knows. And independent studios get to do that.” 22:54 “I think indie developers are in a really good position to be able to use that to push forward that thing.”

 

HIGHLIGHTS
01:07 Introducing Fall Guys
04:08 Utilizing “memekating” and TimTheTatman’s accidental influence
11:37 Putting a gamer in charge of the Fall Guys Twitter
20:07 Indie game developers: Growing the community and finding success
26:57 Humble Links: Cultivating influencers and their relationships with brands

Koala Mattresses: A Brand Strategy Review with Melissa Packham

This episode of Fractal Marketing is called “Koala Mattresses: A Brand Strategy Review” with Melissa Packham, Chief Brand Strategist at A Brand Is Not A Logo. Today, Melissa starts off with Koala’s name recall and going international.

They then discuss Koala’s guerilla marketing choices, their disruption of the industry with superior offerings, and their success in challenging titans in the business. Melissa also unpacks Koala’s logo and their choice to be transparent as an ethical and socially-conscious brand.

HIGHLIGHTS

01:38 Analyzing Koala as a brand name 

07:00 Disrupting the industry and challenging the competition 

13:53 Discussing traditional marketing channels and Koala’s logo

21:52 Embracing the future and being a socially-conscious brand

QUOTES

02:35 “It’s obviously a strong hook for them overseas because the association with cuddly koalas and Australia is so strong.”

07:49 “They set out not with the intention to launch a mattress, they set out to disrupt a category by improving customer experience.”

20:19 “The lower case kinds of suggests that it’s more approachable and modern than a very Times New Roman kind of Serif typography choice there. In terms of visual, it’s already saying that it’s a modern brand.”

22:30 “The reason more businesses are stepping up to the plate on doing social good is because, quite frankly, consumers are demanding it and have been demanding it for years. And it is definitely the global majority now.”

27:00 “People trust brands. They trust brands to take action and so that’s why they’ve trusted brands for so long and now they’re actively choosing brands that align with their values. And, in fact, they trust them more than governments.”

Don’t fear your Trumpian brand

In the US, voting is optional, just like our consumer spending is.

And Trump (maybe unwittingly) has discovered that it doesn’t matter how many people hate you, just how many people love you. Because if your ‘love’ something, then you get out and vote for it. or you’ll get out and buy it.

 

In this short podcast episode, I discuss why great brands will always attract some haters, and we need to learn to embrace that.

How to be unique in a booming niche like craft beer

This episode of Fractal Marketing is called “How to be unique in a booming niche like craft beer” and today’s guest is Richard Jeffares, founder of TWØBAYS Brewing Co, is a pioneer of gluten-free, vegan, and lactose-free craft beer in Australia.

Richard starts by laying the context for a gluten-free product, and for TWØBAYS, that is the niche of coeliacs. He then discusses the early successes of the brand and their plans for brand awareness and expansion in 2020, including social media and word of mouth marketing

QUOTES

05:19 “It’s just not the same as sitting there at the bar and you’re drinking the cider while everyone else is drinking beer, for me anyway. You feel different. And unless you love cider and don’t like beer, which I don’t, you want to fit in with everybody else. So that’s really been the crux of it is, just want to be inclusive.”

06:55 “So we then negotiated the exclusive rights to import millet, buckwheat, and rice from these gluten-free malt houses in the US and bring them in by the containerload. So we’ve got, I think it’s 11 or 12 different millet malts, 1 buckwheat and about 6 or 7 different rice malts that we can use to make the beers that we have at the tap or even in package.”

12:11 “So from April to December, we got to about 750 locations around Australia, so anywhere from Port Douglas, Hobart and Perth and probably of those, I’d say 250, probably 200 of them are the big guys and the other 550 are independents. And so we’ve really wanted to make sure we try and do both strategies.”

27:30 “We’re 100% dedicated brewery and no barley comes in, sort of a no gluten allowed setup. So if you then go to a contract brewer, which is what these big guys are doing and say hey, brew me a gluten-free beer, then that contract brewer is going to make sure that throughout their whole manufacturing process, they are doing everything to avoid gluten.”

28:19 “We do offer it to other breweries if they want to but when they realize the price of that malt compared to barley, they’re kind of go, uhh. Then we talk about how they’re going to clean their mill, which you can’t do, so how are you going to mill that barley to brew with it? How are you going to clean your tanks? All those sort of things. And I say, well, why don’t you just buy my beer?”

Background

TWØBAYS Brewing Co was born from the need to avoid gluten and a trip to America which opened the eyes of Founder, Richard Jeffares, to breweries in Portland, Seattle, Denver and Montreal who were crafting high quality, gluten-free beers, so he decided to bring high-quality craft beers to Australia.

HIGHLIGHTS

01:49 Introduction to TWØBAYS

05:41 Creating gluten-free beer in Australia

09:23 Marketing TWØBAYS

16:27 Expansion and markers of success

25:07 Competing with the big names

RESOURCES

https://www.twobays.beer/

https://www.instagram.com/twobaysbeer/

https://www.facebook.com/twobaysbeer

The difficult (but not impossible) task of content marketing for startups

Many startups have this issue, they want to play the long game and create a content marketing strategy that will bring the people in. These startups understand that they won’t see an ROI on it for months and that it’ll eventually help them in many ways. From helping them become authorities in their industries, to helping their SEO and getting themselves higher in the SERPs.

The problem in this is that it could be difficult for a startup to follow the process of content marketing cause they are such a new company. Also, they can’t afford to really pay someone to do it for them. I wanted to go through what startups might have to look at when it comes to putting together a content marketing strategy, and where they may fall over.

Getting Started

When it comes to putting together your strategy, you’ll need to understand two things:

  • Your goals for the content
  • Your mission statement

This automatically can be an issue for startups as they may not have time to put into understanding their goals and what their overall mission statement is. There is somewhat good news though, as your startup is solving a problem, yes?

This is something you can write about, to begin with as it’ll come with some pretty awesome benefits.

Finding your audience

One of the main things that writing about your problem can help your startup is building your its audience. This is a great way to start to see who engages with your content, and this may give you insights into who your first users could be.

If you write about specific problems that your features make easier, engagement metrics can help you decided what should be focused on. This will definitely help startups who are indecisive about the MVP or features for their version one launch.

If you haven’t launch either, this is another way to keep your perspective users engaged with you and your startup. Yes, you will also gain ‘Authority’ as well, but it’s trust that you can solve the problem that your potential users are interested in.

Builds your SEO

A technical benefit that will help you, in the long run, is what your content will do for your website’s optimisation. The continual traffic to your site will tell google that your site as some importance to certain people.

If you optimise your content (particularly articles) around certain keywords and don’t overdo it, you’ll start to rank organically in the SERPs. That’s a really good thing, especially if it’s keywords that your potential users are typing into google.

Set up a system

One of the main things that most founders (and some marketers, so don’t sweat too much) do after they start their content marketing is to let barriers get in the way. Some of these barriers could be the lack of time or just general inspiration to keep writing.

One thing that you should consider is setting up a system that has you continually researching, writing, and analysing your content. This can involve your team, but should definitely involve your audience/users.

Research

When researching, you want to go to your users (if you have any) and ask them questions around some of their problems you are trying to fix. To be fair, this should already be in your product build cycle anyway. If you have a limited/small amount of users, then ask questions to your audience as you grow.

The other way to do this is, of course, on the internet. There are many platforms on the internets that can help you come up with content ideas. Here are some of the ones I’ve used.

Also Asked — a new website that takes your search term and returns the ‘People also asked’ section in Google search.

Answer the Public — this tool brings Google’s autosuggest into a data visualisation setting.

Google Search Console — shows you your presence in Google’s SERPs and lets you dig deeper into what your audience might be searching when they land on your website.

Writing

Writing your content involves taking your research and then putting it together then tailoring it your audience. If it’s not tailored, you won’t get the same engagement and it will just sit there.

Now let’s talk about keywords, I beg you to not be annoying about it. You don’t need to shove a hundred different keywords into one article. You also don’t need to shove the same keyword into every sentence. Not only will it annoy your audience, but you’ll also be punished by the search engines.

You do want to target those keywords you spent a good time identifying but you want to keep the flow of the article natural. If you realise half-way through that you’re either a/ not using the keyword or b/ shoving the keyword in, you should stop.

You can then either continue writing the article that your accidentally writing (can still be a good thing) or start again with more of a focus on how to write with the keyword. Either way, you’re going to get an article that is still tailored to your audience.

Analysing

This is becoming my favourite part of the content, cause it is shown to be one of the most important parts. Without being able to analyse your content (be it blogs, ebooks, etc.) you’re just writing something, putting it out, and walking away.

Analytics gives you the insights you need to pinpoint what is working. Is your blog reaching your audience through google, or is audience mainly on your twitter? You won’t know unless you have something set up that can let you delve deep into the performance of your content.

It is hard though, and there are so many ways to analyse your content. The issue is you distribute your content across the entire internet through multiple channels. It then gets shared around and some times it’s even stolen (seriously?!).

The best piece of advice

Look, I’m pretty bad at taking my own advice but I’ve one hundred per cent been working on it and I’ve seen all the benefits that I’ve told others about. I know, however, that until you do it, you will see how content marketing can benefit your startup.

I would say though, just give it a go. It can fit perfectly into everything else you’re doing to build your startup.

Happy building, crying, and building some more.

Daniel is one of the co-founders of CoWryte, a startup building an end-to-end solution that lets time-poor content marketing professionals create content more efficiently.

Starting with blogs, the platform will let you create, publish, and then analyse your reach and engagement across the web and social media.

You can talk more about startups and content marketing with him on Twitter or LinkedIn

Online Marketing for Financial Advisors

As a financial advisor, your goal is to grow your business, manage the needs of your existing clients, save time and make more money. It’s time to think about optimizing your marketing channels. The financial service industry is slow to adopt online marketing practices. Earlier, a skilled salesperson would meet with prospective clients in person and this would work because advisors were in control of all the information that investors needed to make the selection decisions. But things are now changing. The internet makes this culture obsolete. When it comes to generating leads, traditional marketing efforts like seminars and referrals won’t cut it anymore.

What does online marketing entail?

  • Search engine optimization
  • Simple notification service or short message service
  • Social media
  • Paid ads (PPC) and placements
  • Webinars

Here are a few things to know about online marketing-

Inbound Marketing

The biggest trend that is impacting the way financial advisors market their services is inbound marketing. It uses a combination of social media, free offers, email marketing and blogging (which is considered content creation marketing) to connect with clients who might be interested in the products/ services you offer. The past has largely witnessed advisors relying on outbound marketing strategies to win new clients like seminars, direct mail, and telemarketing. These are rendered ineffective as more and more people are now using the internet to find and select financial professionals.

Your website should be an extension of you

Your homepage has 10 seconds to deliver a compelling message that will cause clients to want to learn more. If you fail to make an immediate impression, your clients will move on. People do not want to have to search for information on your website. A person should be able to know exactly what is it you do by glancing at your webpage. How to achieve this? by designing your website strategically to generate leads and ensure a positive organic user experience.

Video marketing is very effective

Video marketing is rapidly becoming a dominant force on the internet, surpassing the written word. It is a highly effective way of conveying information quickly and creatively. It is after all the next best thing to a meeting with a client in person. Social media platforms like Facebook and Instagram have live video streams that will help you communicate instantly with clients creating a highly engaging user experience.

Blogging gives you a voice

Outbound marketing tactics can lead to rejection rates that exceed 95%. Additionally, they are disruptive because you are contacting people who do not wish to be contacted. Bogging is by far the single best way to generate traffic for your website. It keeps the content on your website fresh and helps remarkably with SEO value. If you produce stellar blog content, you can easily solve financial problems for clients, establish yourself as an expert in the field, increase traffic and produce contact data for your drip system.

Engaging with your audience is crucial for your firm’s digital presence. You have to actively market your business where people spend most of their time if you wish to build brand trust. Also, it helps immensely with referrals. People are more likely to trust other people who have used your services than you. Online marketing, after all, is not a set it and forget strategy and it most definitely is not an overnight phenomenon. While content is definitely important, it’s just a piece of an overall campaign that aims to move a prospect closer to the advisor over time. Generate awareness of your firm and recognize that your prospects will evaluate your services before signing on. The ultimate aim of online marketing is to successfully get clients onboard. From there, it’s a slow but effective process.

Financial Planning Marketing

Financial planning is indispensable if you wish to determine your short term and long term financial goals. It doesn’t matter how committed you are to your business, finances are your top priority; if the money is not there you simply won’t succeed. Similarly, business development is the ultimate priority for any financial advisor and a flourishing business translates into a bigger bottom line. There are always however more referrals to ask for, more accounts to get and more new clients to prospect. Planners looking to increase their marketing efforts must consider implementing the best strategies that will nurture and grow their practice.

If you are a financial planner, you’d want to market yourself in the most cost-effective way possible. Whether you are an established practice or a new firm looking for a comprehensive way to get your name out there, you need stellar marketing solutions. Here’s why-

Interact with your niche market

To help develop a polished, unique and consistent way for potential clients to interact with your firm. You also have the benefit of a highly experienced, fully-staffed marketing department who will guide you and assist you in every way possible and partner with you to implement a marketing strategy aligned with your resources, ability, time, sourced from your strength and aimed directly at your prosperous future.

Save time and money

You may not have the budget for full-time marketing staff- a good one-stop-shop will help you with everything from establishing a strategy for building and promoting your professional website. You can now focus on and proact what you do best while keeping new client development and business growth a priority.

Stand out from the pack

It’s a highly competitive marketplace. If you leverage the right expertise and tools, you can easily gain access to strategic, intelligible marketing plans that include compelling content to differentiate you from your competition and demonstrate the experience you bring to your clients.

How will a comprehensive marketing solution help me?

Branding

If you implement a branding strategy you can easily stand out from the stiff competition and ensure your message is not ripe with jargon. A firm message is the core differentiator for your brand. An effective marketing strategy will focus on offering an initial freebie or help you stay ahead of the curve by explaining prospects what your CFP or CFA designation means to them and how it will help them achieve results. You can additionally develop your brand by highlighting the benefits.

It will help you share your knowledge

You can hold a seminar keeping in mind your target market and share relevant information that will show participants that you have the right answers to all their financial planning challenges. You need to put your knowledge out there in order to establish credibility. A good marketing solution provider understands the significance of a website that is secure, compliant and tailored to your target audience.

Referrals

When it comes to the trust needed to handle financial affairs, nothing beats new business from clients who are referred to you by other satisfied clients. An effective marketing strategy will help you get your products and services across people and network with accountants, lawyers and other non-competing professionals who happen to appeal to the same target market.

Ultimately your services add tremendous value by eliminating uncertainty, stress or obstacles to your clients’ ambitions. They can sleep better at night knowing that their taxes and finances are in good hands. Expand your services by being top of mind for your client. Clients’ financial planning needs are rapidly changing. With rampant mistrust in the financial services industry, clients are now hunting for the objective, effective and trusted insights from their CPAs. As their highly trusted accountant, it’s time for you to step up to the opportunity.